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Edward Rams
Edward Rams

Elementary And Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally (8th Edition) (Teaching Student-C ((TOP))



Gersten, R., Beckmann, S., Clarke, B., Foegen, A., Marsh, L., Star, J. R., & Witzel, B. (2009). Assisting students struggling with mathematics: Response to intervention (RTI) for elementary and middle schools. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved from _math_pg_042109.pdf




Elementary And Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally (8th Edition) (Teaching Student-C



Karen S. Karp is a professor of mathematics education at the University of Louisville in Kentucky. Prior to entering the field of teacher education she was an elementary school teacher in New York. Karen is a co-author of Feisty Females: Inspiring Girls to Think Mathematically, which is aligned with her research interests on teaching mathematics to diverse populations. With Jennifer, Karen co-edited Growing Professionally: Readings from NCTM Publications for Grades K-8 and co-authored (along with Janet Caldwell) Developing Essential Understanding of Addition and Subtraction for Teaching Mathematics in Pre-K-Grade 2. She is a former member of the Board of Directors of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and a former president of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE). She continues to work in classrooms with elementary and middle school students and with teachers at all levels who work with students with disabilities.


Jennifer M. Bay-Williams is a professor of mathematics education at the University of Louisville (Kentucky). Jennifer has published many articles on teaching and learning in NCTM journals. She has also coauthored numerous books, including: Developing Essential Understanding of Addition and Subtraction for Teaching Mathematics in Pre-K-Grade 2, Math and Literature: Grades 6-8, Math and Nonfiction: Grades 6-8, and Navigating through Connections in Grades 6-8. She is the author of the Field Experience Guide for this book. Jennifer taught elementary, middle, and high school in Missouri and in Peru, and continues to work in classrooms at all levels with students and with teachers. Jennifer is on the Board of Directors for TODOS: Equity for All, Editor for the 2012 NCTM Yearbook, and past-president of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE).


MELODY RANDELhas over 20 years of classroom teaching experience at the elementary, middle school, and university levels, and has been a Math Solutions consultant for over 17 years. She has a particular interest in the areas of teaching English learners and using differentiated instruction. She is one of the authors of the Math Reasoning Inventory (MRI).


DANIELLE WEILLhas over 18 years of experience teaching at the upper elementary and middle school levels. She is currently a 6th grade teacher and math leader at her school in California, in addition to working as a Math Solutions consultant. She worked closely with Marilyn Burns during the development of the Teaching Arithmetic: Introducing and Extending Fractions books.


Pre-service teachers who recall their own upbringing as caring and nurturing were also more likely to experience closeness with the students in their field placement classrooms (Kesner, 2000). Teachers' beliefs and the types of practices that teachers prefer also appear to be important. Kindergarten teachers who use more age-appropriate, student-centered teaching practices reported less conflictual relationships with their kindergarten students than those who use more didactic, teacher-centered strategies (Manticopoulous, 2005). Much less is known about the teacher characteristics that contribute to positive teacher-student relationships at the middle and high school level.


The Child Development Project (CDP) focuses on fostering caring peer relationships, including students in decision-making during classroom meetings, and teaching students to better understand the feelings, needs and perspectives of others. The goal of CDP is to promote positive development among students and build upon their strengths. Students exposed to this intervention feel more positive about school and are more motivated (e.g., showed more task orientation and greater intrinsic motivation) than their counterparts not receiving this intervention in elementary school (Solomon, Battistich, Watson, Schaps, & Lewis, 2000). Likewise, CDP appears to have some long-lasting effects; students enrolled in the CDP elementary schools were less antisocial and more prosocial in middle school as well (Battistich et al., 2004). Further, in a district that pressed for high achievement, CDP was linked to positive effects on achievement outcomes as well as gains in socio-emotional skills.


Teacher candidates who complete a DES program are eligible for WI teaching license in either the early childhood (2088, birth - grade 3) or elementary and middle school (2088, grades K-9) ranges. Teacher candidates who complete a dual licensure program are also eligible for a WI teaching license in the kindergarten - grade 12 (K-12) range in the aligned area. DES programs that lead to dual licensure include Elementary and Middle School (2088, grades K-9) with Special Education (2081, grades K-12) or Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESL certification 1395, grades K-12). Two additional programs offered in collaboration with the Global Cultures & Languages Department lead to dual licensure in Elementary and Middle School (2088, grades K-9) and French (1355, grades K-12) or Spanish (1365, grades K-12).


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